Researchers See Comeback For Europe’s Rare Animals

stocks were sharply lower Friday, with major averages poised to finish lower for the week, following the latest consumer sentiment report and as mounting concerns of a potential government shutdown weighed on markets. Congress must reach an agreement on the budget before October 1, next Tuesday, to prevent a government shutdown that could result in federal employees taking unpaid temporary leave and a delay in the payment of military personnel. Reuters reported on Wednesday that Senior Republican Jeff Sessions said there will be no shutdown or government default. House speaker John Boehner said a Republican proposal is coming that will tie federal government spending cuts to a U.S. debt limit increase. (Read More: Brawl in US Congressshould the world care? ) On the data front, the European Commission released figures on Friday showing that euro zone confidence picked up in September. An economic sentiment index, that gauges both businesses and consumers, rose to 96.9 in September from 95.3 in August, reaching its best level for two years. Nationwide released its house price index for the U.K. which showed a 5 percent (year-on-year) rise amid growing concerns that stimulus in the country is fueling a bubble in prices. House builder Persimmon led Britain’s FTSE lower on the prospect of less stimulus from the Bank of England and signs that politicians are fearful of a property bubble. Persimmon shed 4.3 percent by the day’s close. The FTSE 100 closed the day down 0.9 percent, ending the whole week lower by 1.31 percent.

Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Researchers see comeback for Europe’s rare animals AP 1:02 p.m. EDT September 26, 2013 European bison also known as wisent, gather in the woods near Bad Berleburg, Germany in September. (Photo: Marius Becker, AP) Wild boars, greys wolves and white-tailed eagles have made a comeback in Europe Study claims dozens of species have been brought back from the brink of extinction Researchers noted that many of the 18 mammal and 19 bird species studied in the report remain in peril SHARE 1 CONNECT 20 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE BERLIN (AP) Wild boars, greys wolves and white-tailed eagles have made a comeback in Europe thanks to decades-long conservation efforts. A study published Thursday by the London Zoological Society claims dozens of species have been brought back from the brink of extinction and some are now thriving. Researchers from BirdLife International and the European Bird Census Council contributed to the study, which found that protecting habitats, restricting hunting, reducing pollution and the careful reintroduction were key to the species’ survival. The population of European bison, also known as wisent, has increased more than 3,000 percent since the 1950s, the study said. Still, researchers noted that many of the 18 mammal and 19 bird species studied in the report remain in peril. Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. USA NOW