New York Road Rage Investigation Prompts Second Undercover Cop To Come Forward

Now that Capital is close to filling up its reporter ranks on the politics and media desks, editors are lining up several weekly city columnists for the site’s early November relaunch. Capital’s first three columnists will be Jim Windolf, a Vanity Fair contributing editor who has written for several publications and started the New York Observer’s “New York World” column; Joanna Molloy, a veteran Daily News gossip writer and co-author of a new book on the subject; and Glynnis MacNicol, a writer and co-founder of TheLi.st and former media editor at Business Insider and Mediaite. The model will be more Jimmy Breslin than Joe Scarborough. While Politico columnists, like Scarborough or National Review editor Rich Lowry, comment on political and policy debates, Capital’s writers will produce reported columns that also express a point of view. They’ll draw from the city columnist tradition that extends from tabloid muckraking, a la Breslin, to the New York Times’ Clyde Haberman. Capital co-editor Tom McGeveran told HuffPost the new columns will focus on “New York issues, New York personalities and New York places.” “This is a tradition in which the best columns always entertain,” McGeveran said. “Sometimes they even change the minds of the city’s big decision makers; better yet is when a columnist changes their plans.” The new columnists are not joining full-time, but will write weekly for the site. However, Capital has been filling up the newsroom with full-time reporters and editors since Politico purchased the three-year-old site in September. On the politics front, Capital’s hired Daily News veteran Joanne Wasserman , the Albany Times Union’s Jimmy Vielkind , the New York Post’s Sally Goldenberg . Capital media reporter Joe Pompeo will now be joined on the desk by several additional reporters, including TV Newser’s Alex Weprin, Women’s Wear Daily’s Matthew Lynch, former Newsday and Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Nicole Levy, and World Policy Journal’s Johana Bhuiyan. In addition, Peter Sterne will cover media part-time for the site while finishing at Columbia University. Follow Michael Calderone on Twitter: www.twitter.com/mlcalderone FOLLOW MEDIA

Alleged al Qaeda operative Al Libi taken to New York week after capture in Libya

officials say Authorities say he played role in bombings at American embassies in 1998 He is scheduled to appear before a federal official in NYC on Tuesday (CNN) — The United States has brought Abu Anas al Libi — an alleged al Qaeda operative whom U.S. Army Delta Force soldiers captured in Libya this month — to New York, a U.S. attorney’s office said Monday. He was transferred to law enforcement custody and brought to the United States on Saturday, according to a letter from the office of Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara to a federal judge. Al Libi is expected to appear before a judicial officer on Tuesday, Bharara’s office said. His family in Tripoli said they were shocked that he was in the United States. They had received no details of his whereabouts from the U.S. or Libyan governments, family members told CNN. Al Libi arrives in the U.S. Where should al Libi be tried? His son, Abdullah, said the family hoped to get him a lawyer that would “work with him, for him.” It was unclear if al Libi already has a lawyer.

But when CBS News met Rodriguez at the district attorney’s office Tuesday, he was the one on the hot seat, CBS News senior correspondent John Miller reported on “CBS This Morning” Wednesday. NYC motorcycle road rage incident may have ruined a large investigation Rodriguez and his lawyer, Pat Bonanno, emerged from a meeting with prosecutors after more than an hour of discussions over the case of the motorcycle assault against SUV driver Alexian Lien in front of his wife and child. Rodriguez said he had nothing to do with the assault. Miller asked Rodriguez, “How hard has this been going through this, especially with all the attention?” Rodriguez said, “It has been difficult, but I can only take it one day at a time from now on.” Rodriguez is now the second New York City undercover officer to come forward to say he was riding with the group that was involved in the assault. Just last week, the first undercover New York City detective who came forward was charged with assault, riot and criminal mischief after investigators said he lied about his role in the attack on the SUV. The lawyer for Rodriguez says his client’s story checks out. Miller asked, “What you told him was you weren’t there for any assault, you weren’t part of any assault, you didn’t even witness any assault?” Bonanno interrupted, saying, “John, with all due respect, I’m gonna stop you right there.” Bonanno says his client had fallen to the rear of the pack of motorcycles and that he didn’t see the confrontation where the SUV was surrounded by motorcycles and drove over two of them to escape. Rodriguez reportedly told investigators he took a different exit off the highway to visit his grandfather in a nursing home, so he was never even on the street where the final assault took place. Bonanno said, “Police Officer Matt Rodriguez voluntarily presented himself to the Manhattan district attorney’s office to answer any and all questions and concerns the had regarding his alleged involvement of the incidents of September 29th. It appears hat the district attorney’s office will discover, as we have known from day one, that there are no acts of criminality on behalf of Matthew Rodriguez.” Asked how it felt to sit down with investigators and get his story out, Rodriguez said, “I was just glad to be given the opportunity to actually say my piece.” Miller asked Bonanno, “Is it appropriate for police officers to be part of some motorcycle gang?” “Number one, this is not a motorcycle gang,” Bonanno said. “Frontline Soldiers was a small group of law enforcement individuals and former veterans. NYPD itself has a motorcycle club, so he was part of an organization of other law enforcement individuals that he thought was involved in charitable organizations and charitable things.” Miller added on “CBS This Morning” that Rodriguez has not been suspended or put on modified assignment, which is assigned to desk duty without a badge or a gun, but prosecutors do have other questions for him, including what contact he did or didn’t have with other officers before, during and after the assault. And the police department, in their internal investigation, will also want to know why he waited as long as he did to come forward when the investigation was highly publicized. For more on this case, watch John Miller’s full report above. 2013 CBS Interactive Inc.