London Police Using 200 Super-recognizers: What Makes Them “super”?

Landmark GBP25 million Gift for London Business School’s Old Marylebone Town Hall

PC Paul Hyland a Metropolitan Police super-recognizer poses for photographs beside computer screens at the force’s New Scotland Yard headquarters in London on Sept. 18, 2013./ AP London police officers at Scotland Yard have reportedly been getting helped by a new breed of police-officers with special skills: “super-recognizers.” The Associated Press reported Friday that since 2011, about 200 London police officers have been recruited into an elite squad of super-recognizers that search crime surveillance photos in the hopes of identifying suspects based on perps they’d seen before. Super recognizers were responsible for nearly 30 percent of the 4,000 people who were arrested following the 2011 London riots , according to the report. “When we have an image of an unidentified criminal, I know exactly who to ask instead of sending it out to everyone and getting a bunch of false leads,” Mick Neville, Detective Chief Inspector at Scotland Yard who created the unit, told the AP. Just what exactly makes someone a super-recognizer? Richard Russell, an assistant professor of psychology at Gettysburg College in Pa., led a 2009 study that coined the phrase “super-recognizers.” He theorizes people with this superior facial recognition ability are on the other end of a spectrum from people who suffer from another condition called “face-blindness,” or prosopagnosia. In face-blindness, people have an inability to recognize familiar faces, even of celebrities and people they know well. Russell told CBSNews.com he does not believe super-recognizers are doing anything dramatically different than average people when they look at someone to recognize a familiar face. He thinks they don’t hone in on someone’s eyes or a specific feature to recognize someone better than a typical individual would, he said. “We don’t really know whether they are doing something qualitatively different than other people. I assume they are not,” said Russell. “It might be a quantitative difference — still using the same kind of processes, but maybe they’re better.” One of the goals of facial recognition research is to understand which cues are leading people to identify a face. It could be a difference in how a person processes the color contrast between the lips and skin or the distance between parts of the face that leads to this recognition, he postulated.

5 things to know after Vikings beat Steelers 34-27 in London to breathe life into their season

Photographer take pictures as the Soyuz TMA-10M spacecraft carrying the International Space Station (ISS) crew of U.S. astronaut U.S. astronaut Michael Hopkins, Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy blasts off from the launch pad at the Baikonur cosmodrome September 26, 2013. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov  (KAZAKHSTAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

So hes doing exactly what I expected. LONG BYE: The Steelers have two weeks to ponder the predicament they find themselves in. No team has made the playoffs after starting 0-4 since the 1992 San Diego Chargers. And if the Steelers dont improve dramatically, theres little to indicate theyll replicate that feat. Right now you could say were the worst team in the league, Roethlisberger said. That hurts. The quarterback was hurting physically, too, after hurting the index finger on his throwing hand and being sacked five times by the Vikings. He said the finger wasnt broken and should be fine. SAVED BY BELL? If theres anything positive for the Steelers to take back home from London, it was the performance of LeVeon Bell. The rookie running back made his much-anticipated debut after a foot injury and gave the team its first two rushing touchdowns of the season. He first broke off to the right for an 8-yard score to make it 10-7, somersaulting into the end zone, and pulled Pittsburgh within 3 by plowing in from the 1-yard line in the third quarter. BLOCK PARTY: Peterson has his favorite blocker back, and that makes him even more difficult to stop.

Mr Ofer said: “I have enjoyed a long association with the School and believe that it offers something uniquely valuable in the world of business education, combining strong fundamental business and management education with an emphasis on the business community being part of the solution for a better society. “This project is an important step towards ensuring the School can continue to grow and prosper in the future, creating new generations of leaders who can address the challenges of business and wider society. My father Sammy enjoyed learning from others and throughout his career in shipping was known to spend many hours speaking with seamen and officers of vessels, rather than being tucked away in his office. This sense of curiosity resonates strongly with London Business School’s community where students are not just stretched intellectually; they become a part of an ever-expanding international community, learning as much from each other as from the faculty,” he continued. “One of the goals of The Idan and Batia Ofer Foundation is to ensure the next generation of Israeli entrepreneurs is equipped to cope with the challenges of globalisation. London Business School is at the forefront of helping to meet these challenges. The Foundation hopes in this small way to contribute to economic growth in the region, ultimately improving the prospects for peace and stability.” Professor Sir Andrew Likierman, Dean, London Business School, said: “This wonderfully generous gift will enable us to convert this iconic London landmark for use as a state-of-the-art teaching and learning facility. It will provide us with the space we need and enable us to achieve our vision of having a profound impact on the way the world does business.” Today, the School has also announced its first comprehensive fundraising campaign – to raise GBP100 million over the next five years. The School’s campaign is to fund the development of Old Marylebone Town Hall, attract world class faculty, double its scholarships offering, invest in the latest technology, and to develop an unrestricted fund in support of the School’s strategic priorities. The campaign launch will cover six world cities in a three week period, in addition to London. A series of high profile events, chaired by the School’s dean, Professor Sir Andrew Likierman and other prominent faculty and alumni, will set out the School’s vision for the future. The launch for Asia will be held at Hong Kong’s Conrad Hotel on October 15th. The region has almost two and a half thousand London Business School alumni, with nine active alumni clubs, and over 260 current students. The Hon Apurv Bagri, London Business School’s Campaign Chairman and Deputy Chairman of the School’s Governing Body and Managing Director, Metdist Group, added: “I’m delighted that we are able to announce this gift as we launch the School’s first ever comprehensive fundraising campaign.